105th  Amendment  Bill  2021: Mandal  Commission

Reading time : 8 minutes

The  Mandal  Commission,  also  known  as  the  Socially  and  Educationally  Backward  Groups  Commission  (SEBC),  was  founded  in  India  in  1979  by  the  Janata  Party  government,  led  by  Prime  Minister  Morarji  Desai,  with  the  purpose  of  “identifying  India’s  socially  or  educationally  backward  classes[1] .”   

VP  Singh,  the  then-prime  minister,  made  a  momentous  declaration  in  Parliament  on  August  7,  1990.  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBCs)  will  have  a  27  percent  reservation  in  jobs  in  central  government  services  and  public  sector  units,  Singh  said  before  both  Houses. 

Singh  merely  fulfilled  half  of  the  Mandal  Commission’s  first  recommendation  by  granting  OBCs  employment  reservations.  The  Mandal  Commission,  chaired  by  BP  Mandal,  was  established  on  January  1,  1979.  On  December  31,  1980,  it  turned  in  its  report.  The  reservation  for  OBCs  in  central  educational  institutions  was  the  second  half  of  the  Commission’s  recommendation. 

Land  redistribution  and  changes  in  production  relations  were  also  advocated  by  the  Mandal  Commission.  “Reservations  in  government  employment  and  educational  institutions,  as  well  as  all  financial  support,  will  remain  palliatives  unless  the  problem  of  backwardness  is  addressed  at  its  root,”  it  said  in  its  report.  Scheduled  Castes,  Scheduled  Tribes,  and  Other  Backward  Classes  make  up  the  majority  of  small  landowners,  tenants,  agricultural  labour,  destitute  rural  artisans,  unskilled  employees,  and  so  on.” 

The  Mandal  Commission  was  established. 

Every  ten  years,  a  commission  to  investigate  the  conditions  of  India’s  backward  classes  is  appointed  for  the  purposes  of  Articles  15  and  16.  (Prohibition  of  Discrimination  on  grounds  of  religion,  race,  caste,  sex  or  place  of  birth).  The  First  Backward  Classes  Commission  had  a  diverse  membership,  however  the  Second  Commission  appeared  to  be  partisan  in  nature,  with  solely  members  from  the  backward  castes.  Four  of  the  Commission’s  five  members  were  from  the  OBC  community;  the  fifth,  L.R.  Naik,  was  from  the  Dalit  community  and  the  Commission’s  only  member  from  the  scheduled  castes.  Due  to  its  chairman,  Shri.  B.P.  Mandal,  it  is  known  as  the  Mandal  Commission. 

Policy  on  Reservations 

To  gather  the  necessary  data  and  evidence,  the  Mandal  Commission  used  a  variety  of  methods  and  techniques.  The  commission  established  eleven  criteria  to  determine  who  qualified  as  a  member  of  the  “other  backward  class,”  which  could  be  divided  into  three  categories:  social,  educational,  and  economic.  To  identify  OBCs,  11  criteria  were  created.  

Other  Backward  Class  (OBC) 

The  Government  of  India  uses  the  term  Other  Backward  Class  (OBC)  to  designate  castes  that  are  educationally  or  socially  disadvantaged.  Along  with  General  Class,  Scheduled  Castes,  and  Scheduled  Tribes,  it  is  one  of  India’s  official  population  classifications.  According  to  the  Mandal  Commission  study  from  1980,  the  OBCs  make  up  52  percent  of  the  country’s  population. 

OBCs  are  defined  as  socially  and  educationally  backward  classes  under  the  Indian  Constitution,  and  the  Indian  government  is  required  to  ensure  their  social  and  educational  development  –  for  example,  OBCs  are  entitled  to  27  percent  reservations  in  public  sector  jobs  and  higher  education. 

The  Backward  Classes  Cell  of  the  Ministry  of  Home  Affairs  was  in  charge  of  the  affairs  of  the  Backward  Classes  until  1985.  In  1985,  a  separate  Ministry  of  Welfare  (later  called  the  Ministry  of  Social  Justice  and  Empowerment)  was  established  to  deal  with  issues  affecting  Scheduled  Castes,  Scheduled  Tribes,  and  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBCs).  The  Ministry’s  Backward  Classes  Division  is  responsible  for  policy,  planning,  and  implementation  of  OBC  social  and  economic  empowerment  programmes,  as  well  as  matters  relating  to  the  National  Backward  Classes  Finance  and  Development  Corporation  and  the  National  Commission  for  Backward  Classes,  two  institutions  established  for  the  welfare  of  OBCs. 

Legal  Dispute 

Creamy  Layer 

Justice  Krishna  Iyer  coined  the  phrase  creamy  layer  in  the  State  of  Kerala  versus  NM  Thomas  case  in  1975,  observing  that  “The  threat  of’reservation’  appears  to  me  to  be  threefold.  Its  benefits  are  largely  taken  away  by  the  ‘backward’  caste  or  class’s  top  creamy  layer,  keeping  the  weakest  among  the  weak  always  weak  and  leaving  the  lucky  layers  to  swallow  the  entire  cake  “.. 

It’s  a  concept  that  establishes  a  limit  within  which  OBC  reservation  benefits  can  be  used.  While  there  is  a  27  percent  quota  for  OBCs  in  government  positions  and  higher  education  institutions,  those  who  fall  under  the  “creamy  layer”  are  not  eligible. 

On  August  13,  1990,  the  government  announced  a  27  percent  quota  for  Socially  and 

Educationally  Backward  Classes  (SEBCs)  in  openings  in  civil  offices  and  services  to  be  filled  by  direct  recruitment,  based  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Second  Backward  Classes  Commission  (Mandal  Commission).  Following  a  legal  challenge,  the  Supreme  Court  upheld  the  27  percent  reserve  for  OBCs  on  November  16,  1992,  subject  to  the  creamy  layer’s  exclusion.[2]    

The  creamy  layer  is  just  for  Other  Backward  Castes  and  does  not  apply  to  other  groups  such  as 

SC  or  ST.  In  1993,  the  creamy  layer  standards  were  set  at  Rs  100,000,  then  increased  to  Rs  250,000  in  2004,  Rs  450,000  in  2008,  and  finally  Rs  600,000  in  2013.  The  National  Commission  for  Backward  Classes  proposed  in  October  2015  that  an  OBC  person  with  an  annual  family  income  of  up  to  Rs  1.5  million  be  regarded  the  minimal  maximum  for  OBC.  NCBC  also  suggested  dividing  OBCs  into  ‘backward,”more  backward,’  and  ‘very  backward’  blocs  and  allocating  27  percent  quota  among  them  in  accordance  to  their  numbers,  in  order  to  prevent  stronger  OBCs  from  monopolising  the  quota  benefit.The  creamy  layer  ceiling  in  the  OBC  category  for  acquiring  job  quota  was  raised  from  Rs  6  lakh  to  Rs  8  lakh  by  the  NDA  government  in  August  2017. 

Difference  between  Amendment  Bill  and  Amendment  Act. 

When  a  modification  in  a  law  is  required,  a  proposal  is  drafted  known  as  an  amendment  bill.  A  member  of  parliament  introduces  a  bill  in  both  the  Lok  Sabha  and  the  Rajya  Sabha  of  parliament.  When  both  houses  agree,  the  bill  is  sent  to  the  president  for  his  approval,  and  once  the  president  signs  it,  it  becomes  the  Amendment  Act  and  becomes  the  law  of  the  country. 

History  of  reservation  in  India. 

When  the  Indian  Constitution  was  adopted  in  1950,  we  adopted  the  reservation  allocated  to  SCs/STs  under  Article  15,  16,  330,  332,  334,  342,  and  366  of  the  Indian  Constitution.  The  first  amendment  to  the  Indian  Constitution,  which  declared  that  reservation  in  educational  institutes  for  SC/ST  was  provided  by  the  first  amendment,  brought  about  a  huge  change  in  the  year  1951.  

The  Supreme  Court  ruled  in  the  case  of  Mr.  Balaji  vs.  State  of  Mysore  in  1963  that  total  reservation  may  not  exceed  50%.  In  1978,  the  Mandal  Commission  was  established  to  consider  a  quota  for  OBCs  (27  percent  seats),  and  in  1992,  the  Supreme  Court  upheld  the  quota  for  OBCs  in  the  Indra  Sawhney  case,  and  then  in  2006,  the  Amendment  Act  of  2005  empowered  states  to  make  special  provisions  for  SEBCs  and  SC/STs  in  admissions  to  educational  institutions.  In  2018,  the  102nd  amendment  was  introduced.  The  Mandal  Commission  asked  and  received  27  percent  reservation  in  1980,  which  was  implemented  in  1992.  In  the  instance  of  Indra  Swahney,  it  was  decided  that  in  whatever  situation  of  reservation,  the  50  percent  cap  would  never  be  exceeded  (including  SC  and  ST  reservation  should  not  cross  50  percent  ). 

102nd    Amendment 

This  Amendment  took  away  the  state’s  power.  The  state  no  longer  has  the  authority  to  determine  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  included  in  the  OBC  list,  and  this  authority  has  been  transferred  to  the  president  and  the  centre  to  determine  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  included  in  the  OBC  list.  The  parliament  will  decide  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  removed  from  the  list  and  which  will  be  added.  

The  national  Commission  for  Backward  Classes  now  has  constitutional  status  as  a  result  of  this  modification.  NCBC  was  founded  in  1993,  and  the  102nd  Amendment  granted  it  constitutional  legitimacy. 

This  change  was  made  under  Article  338B  (102nd  Amendment),   which  deals  with  the  NCBC  structure,  duties,  and  power,  and  was  primarily  for  the  socially  and  educationally  backward  classes  to  fight  for  their  rights,  and  in  Article  342A,  which  stated  that  the  centre  and  president  of 

India  have  the  power  to  make  the  OBC  list.SEBCs  are  defined  under  Article  366  (26C).The  102nd  Constitution  Amendment  Act  of  2018  included  these  articles  into  the  statutes. 

Objective  Of  105th    Constitutional  Amendment  Act 

The  102nd  amendment  was  ratified  by  the  parliament  in  2018,  which  said  that  the  federal  government  and  parliament  have  the  authority  to  compile  a  list  of  OBCs  and  offer  reservations  to  them.  However,  there  was  a  difficulty  in  that  some  people  who  were  on  the  state  list  were  not  on  the  central  list,  and  therefore  were  unable  to  use  the  OBC  reservation  system.  As  a  result,  the  105th  amendment  bill  empowers  the  state  government  to  compile  a  list  of  OBCs  and  award  them  with  reservations.

The  127th  Amendment  Bill  to  the  Constitution  restores  states’  right  to  designate  SEBCs. 

The  127th  amendment  bill  was  introduced  in  the  Lok  Sabha  on  August  9,  2021,  passed  by  the 

Lok  Sabha  on  August  10,  2021,  and  then  passed  by  the  Rajya  Sabha  on  August  11,  2021.  The  Constitutional  Amendment  Bill  is  unique  in  that  it  is  not  like  any  other  bill  in  that  it  does  not  require  joint  seating.  It  can  be  introduced  in  either  house,  but  it  must  be  passed  by  a  special  majority  in  the  other  house.  There  was  not  a  single  vote  against  the  bill  in  the  Lok  Sabha. 

The  105th  Amendment’s  Importance 

The  bill  aims  to  restore  state  governments’  ability  to  identify  OBCs  who  are  socially  and  educationally  disadvantaged. 

The  Union  administration  has  argued  that  the  102nd  amendment’s  sole  purpose  was  to  create  a  Central  List  that  would  only  apply  to  the  Central  government  and  its  institutions.  It  had  nothing  to  do  with  the  State  Backward  Classes  Lists  or  the  State  governments’  authority  to  label  a  community  backward.3    

Nearly  671  OBC  communities  would  have  lost  access  to  reservations  in  educational  institutions  and  appointments  if  the  state  list  had  been  eliminated,  therefore  the  bill  will  assist  them. 

Calls  for  removal  of  50%  cap  on  reservations: 

During  the  debate  over  the  proposed  change,  MPs  from  all  parties  called  for  the  reservation  cap  to  be  removed. 

The  Supreme  Court  set  a  limit  of  50%  for  reservation  quotas  in  the  1992  Indra  Sawhney  &  Others  v.  Union  of  India  decision. 

At  least  three  Indian  states  —  Haryana,  Tamil  Nadu,  and  Chhattisgarh  –  have  enacted  quotas  that  exceed  the  overall  50%  limit.  States  such  as  Gujarat,  Rajasthan,  Jharkhand,  and  Karnataka,  on  the  other  hand,  have  petitioned  the  Supreme  Court  to  raise  the  quota  ceiling. 

The  SC  in  the  Maratha  reservation  issue  had  held  that  extending  the  50%  limit  would  be  tantamount  to  establishing  a  society  based  on  caste  rule  rather  than  one  founded  on  equality.  It  reiterated  that  reservation  under  Article  16(4)  should  not  exceed  50%  except  in  extraordinary  circumstances. 

In  the  Maratha  reservation  case,  the  Supreme  Court  ruled  that  expanding  the  50%  ceiling  would  be  tantamount  to  creating  a  society  based  on  caste  domination  rather  than  equality.  It  reaffirmed  that,  save  in  exceptional  circumstances,  reservations  under  Article  16(4)  should  not  exceed  50%. 

What  was  the  opposition’s  motivation  for  supporting  the  amendment  bill? 

The  opposition  in  Parliament  announced  that  it  will  support  the  127th  Constitution  Amendment  Bill,  which  allows  states  the  authority  to  identify  OBCs. 

Many  regional  parties  have  urged  that  the  State  Governments  be  given  the  right  to  identify  the  backward  classes,  hence  the  amendment  bill  has  political  repercussions. 

The  ruling  BJP  and  opposition  parties,  including  the  Congress,  are  attempting  to  gain  support  from  OBC  populations  in  election-bound  states,  particularly  in  Uttar  Pradesh,  which  is  politically  significant. 

Because  of  the  bill’s  political  implications,  opposition  parties  have  been  pushed  to  align  with  the  ruling  party. 

How  Maratha  reservation  is  related to   105th  amendment? 

In  the  year  2019,  the  Maharashtra  government  gave  the  maratha  community  a  16  percent  reservation,  which  was  challenged  in  the  Bombay  high  court  and  the  Supreme  Court  as  a  violation  of  the  landmark  judgement  Indra  swahney  decision,  which  stated  that  the  reserve  should  not  exceed  50  percent.  Because  22.5  percent  for  SC  and  27  percent  for  OBC  already  made  up  49.5  percent  of  the  reservation,  and  the  Maharashtra  government  added  another  16  percent,  the  supreme  court  declared  this  invalid  and  stated  that  states  do  not  have  the  power  to  make  reservation  lists  because  the  102nd  amendment  was  passed.And,  due  to  the  recent  105th  Amendment,  the  federal  government  will  circumvent  the  Supreme  Court  and  give  state  governments  the  authority  to  establish  OBC  lists  and  provide  reservations  in  accordance  with  them.  

Where  does  the  government  receive  its  information  about  how  much  reservation  should  be  given  to  each  class  and  community? 

They  learn  how  much  reservation  should  be  offered  to  the  class  and  community  through  census.  They  learn  about  the  SC  and  ST  population  rates,  as  well  as  how  many  people  have  migrated  from  India  to  the  United  States.  

Mandal  Commission  detractors 

Mandal  commission  used  data  from  the  1931  census  to  determine  the  population  rate  of  the  OBC  and  demanded  a  27  percent  quota.5    

Critics  of  the  Mandal  Commission  contend  that  bestowing  specific  privileges  based  on  caste  is  unjust,  even  if  it  is  intended  to  address  traditional  caste  inequality.  They  contend  that  individuals  who  are  deserving  of  a  seat  on  the  basis  of  merit  will  be  disadvantaged.  They  consider  the  ramifications  of  unqualified  candidates  being  appointed  to  key  positions  in  society  (doctors,  engineers,  etc.).  As  the  discussion  over  OBC  reservations  grows,  a  few  fascinating  facts  emerge  that  highlight  important  questions.  To  begin  with,  the  percentage  of  OBCs  in  India’s  population  varies  greatly.  It  is  52  percent,  according  to  the  Mandal  Commission  (1980).  

  According  to  the  2001  Indian  Census,  the  Scheduled  Castes  account  for  166,635,700  of  India’s  population  of  1,028,737,436  people,  while  the  Scheduled  Tribes  account  for  84,326,240,  or  16.2  percent  and  8.2  percent,  respectively.  The  census  contains  no  information  on  OBCs.  However,  according  to  the  1999–2000  round  of  the  National  Sample  Survey,  roughly  36%  of  the  country’s  population  is  classified  as  belonging  to  the  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBC).    

Conclusion 

According  to  a  recent  statement  from  the  Ministry  of  Social  Justice  and  Empowerment,  the  Constitution  (One  Hundred  and  Fifth  Amendment)  Act,  2021  went  into  effect  on  August  15, 2021.  The  President’s  signature  to  the  105th  Amendment  Act  last  month  restored  the  power  of  state  governments  and  union  territories  to  identify  and  describe  social  and  economic  issues.[3]     

On  May  5,  a  five-judge  Constitutional  bench  unanimously  overturned  a  Maharashtra  statute  guaranteeing  quotas  to  Marathas.  The  bench  had  refused  to  refer  the  Mandal  decision  from  1992,  which  set  a  50%  quota  limit,  to  a  larger  bench.[4]    

This  topic  has  been  highly  paradoxical  till  now,  as  argument  on  reservation  has  come  from  many  years,  and  it  is  still  being  amended  to  ensure  that  everyone  gets  their  rights  and  that  no  one  faces  prejudice,  and  to  make  India  a  more  equal  society. 

States  and  Union  Territories  will  now  have  the  ability  to  create  their  own  lists  of  socially  and  educationally  disadvantaged  groups.  They  will  be  able  to  do  this  without  having  to  consult  NCBC.  An  OBC  can  now  be  formed  by  any  electorally  significant  group.  According  to  some  experts,  the  Bill  has  the  potential  to  generate  socio-political  upheaval  because  several  sub-castes  are  now  likely  to  demand  quotas. 


The  Mandal  Commission,  also  known  as  the  Socially  and  Educationally  Backward  Groups Commission  (SEBC),  was  founded  in  India  in  1979  by  the  Janata  Party  government,  led  by  Prime  Minister  Morarji  Desai,  with  the  purpose  of  “identifying  India’s  socially  or  educationally  backward  classes[1] .”   

VP  Singh,  the  then-prime  minister,  made  a  momentous  declaration  in  Parliament  on  August  7,  1990.  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBCs)  will  have  a  27  percent  reservation  in  jobs  in  central  government  services  and  public  sector  units,  Singh  said  before  both  Houses. 

Singh  merely  fulfilled  half  of  the  Mandal  Commission’s  first  recommendation  by  granting  OBCs  employment  reservations.  The  Mandal  Commission,  chaired  by  BP  Mandal,  was  established  on  January  1,  1979.  On  December  31,  1980,  it  turned  in  its  report.  The  reservation  for  OBCs  in  central  educational  institutions  was  the  second  half  of  the  Commission’s  recommendation. 

Land  redistribution  and  changes  in  production  relations  were  also  advocated  by  the  Mandal  Commission.  “Reservations  in  government  employment  and  educational  institutions,  as  well  as  all  financial  support,  will  remain  palliatives  unless  the  problem  of  backwardness  is  addressed  at  its  root,”  it  said  in  its  report.  Scheduled  Castes,  Scheduled  Tribes,  and  Other  Backward  Classes  make  up  the  majority  of  small  landowners,  tenants,  agricultural  labour,  destitute  rural  artisans,  unskilled  employees,  and  so  on.” 

The  Mandal  Commission  was  established. 

Every  ten  years,  a  commission  to  investigate  the  conditions  of  India’s  backward  classes  is  appointed  for  the  purposes  of  Articles  15  and  16.  (Prohibition  of  Discrimination  on  grounds  of  religion,  race,  caste,  sex  or  place  of  birth).  The  First  Backward  Classes  Commission  had  a  diverse  membership,  however  the  Second  Commission  appeared  to  be  partisan  in  nature,  with  solely  members  from  the  backward  castes.  Four  of  the  Commission’s  five  members  were  from  the  OBC  community;  the  fifth,  L.R.  Naik,  was  from  the  Dalit  community  and  the  Commission’s  only  member  from  the  scheduled  castes.  Due  to  its  chairman,  Shri.  B.P.  Mandal,  it  is  known  as  the  Mandal  Commission. 

Policy  on  Reservations 

To  gather  the  necessary  data  and  evidence,  the  Mandal  Commission  used  a  variety  of  methods  and  techniques.  The  commission  established  eleven  criteria  to  determine  who  qualified  as  a  member  of  the  “other  backward  class,”  which  could  be  divided  into  three  categories:  social,  educational,  and  economic.  To  identify  OBCs,  11  criteria  were  created.  

Other  Backward  Class  (OBC) 

The  Government  of  India  uses  the  term  Other  Backward  Class  (OBC)  to  designate  castes  that  are  educationally  or  socially  disadvantaged.  Along  with  General  Class,  Scheduled  Castes,  and  Scheduled  Tribes,  it  is  one  of  India’s  official  population  classifications.  According  to  the  Mandal  Commission  study  from  1980,  the  OBCs  make  up  52  percent  of  the  country’s  population. 

OBCs  are  defined  as  socially  and  educationally  backward  classes  under  the  Indian  Constitution,  and  the  Indian  government  is  required  to  ensure  their  social  and  educational  development  –  for  example,  OBCs  are  entitled  to  27  percent  reservations  in  public  sector  jobs  and  higher  education. 

The  Backward  Classes  Cell  of  the  Ministry  of  Home  Affairs  was  in  charge  of  the  affairs  of  the  Backward  Classes  until  1985.  In  1985,  a  separate  Ministry  of  Welfare  (later  called  the  Ministry  of  Social  Justice  and  Empowerment)  was  established  to  deal  with  issues  affecting  Scheduled  Castes,  Scheduled  Tribes,  and  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBCs).  The  Ministry’s  Backward  Classes  Division  is  responsible  for  policy,  planning,  and  implementation  of  OBC  social  and  economic  empowerment  programmes,  as  well  as  matters  relating  to  the  National  Backward  Classes  Finance  and  Development  Corporation  and  the  National  Commission  for  Backward  Classes,  two  institutions  established  for  the  welfare  of  OBCs. 

Legal  Dispute 

Creamy  Layer 

Justice  Krishna  Iyer  coined  the  phrase  creamy  layer  in  the  State  of  Kerala  versus  NM  Thomas  case  in  1975,  observing  that  “The  threat  of’reservation’  appears  to  me  to  be  threefold.  Its  benefits  are  largely  taken  away  by  the  ‘backward’  caste  or  class’s  top  creamy  layer,  keeping  the  weakest  among  the  weak  always  weak  and  leaving  the  lucky  layers  to  swallow  the  entire  cake  “.. 

It’s  a  concept  that  establishes  a  limit  within  which  OBC  reservation  benefits  can  be  used.  While  there  is  a  27  percent  quota  for  OBCs  in  government  positions  and  higher  education  institutions,  those  who  fall  under  the  “creamy  layer”  are  not  eligible. 

On  August  13,  1990,  the  government  announced  a  27  percent  quota  for  Socially  and 

Educationally  Backward  Classes  (SEBCs)  in  openings  in  civil  offices  and  services  to  be  filled  by  direct  recruitment,  based  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Second  Backward  Classes  Commission  (Mandal  Commission).  Following  a  legal  challenge,  the  Supreme  Court  upheld  the  27  percent  reserve  for  OBCs  on  November  16,  1992,  subject  to  the  creamy  layer’s  exclusion.[2]    

The  creamy  layer  is  just  for  Other  Backward  Castes  and  does  not  apply  to  other  groups  such  as  SC  or  ST.  In  1993,  the  creamy  layer  standards  were  set  at  Rs  100,000,  then  increased  to  Rs  250,000  in  2004,  Rs  450,000  in  2008,  and  finally  Rs  600,000  in  2013.  The  National  Commission  for  Backward  Classes  proposed  in  October  2015  that  an  OBC  person  with  an  annual  family  income  of  up  to  Rs  1.5  million  be  regarded  the  minimal  maximum  for  OBC.  NCBC  also  suggested  dividing  OBCs  into  ‘backward,”more  backward,’  and  ‘very  backward’  blocs  and  allocating  27  percent  quota  among  them  in  accordance  to  their  numbers,  in  order  to  prevent  stronger  OBCs  from  monopolising  the  quota  benefit.The  creamy  layer  ceiling  in  the  OBC  category  for  acquiring  job  quota  was  raised  from  Rs  6  lakh  to  Rs  8  lakh  by  the  NDA  government  in  August  2017. 

Difference  between  Amendment  Bill  and  Amendment  Act. 

When  a  modification  in  a  law  is  required,  a  proposal  is  drafted  known  as  an  amendment  bill.  A  member  of  parliament  introduces  a  bill  in  both  the  Lok  Sabha  and  the  Rajya  Sabha  of  parliament.  When  both  houses  agree,  the  bill  is  sent  to  the  president  for  his  approval,  and  once  the  president  signs  it,  it  becomes  the  Amendment  Act  and  becomes  the  law  of  the  country. 

History  of  reservation  in  India. 

When  the  Indian  Constitution  was  adopted  in  1950,  we  adopted  the  reservation  allocated  to  SCs/STs  under  Article  15,  16,  330,  332,  334,  342,  and  366  of  the  Indian  Constitution.  The  first  amendment  to  the  Indian  Constitution,  which  declared  that  reservation  in  educational  institutes  for  SC/ST  was  provided  by  the  first  amendment,  brought  about  a  huge  change  in  the  year  1951.  

The  Supreme  Court  ruled  in  the  case  of  Mr.  Balaji  vs.  State  of  Mysore  in  1963  that  total  reservation  may  not  exceed  50%.  In  1978,  the  Mandal  Commission  was  established  to  consider  a  quota  for  OBCs  (27  percent  seats),  and  in  1992,  the  Supreme  Court  upheld  the  quota  for  OBCs  in  the  Indra  Sawhney  case,  and  then  in  2006,  the  Amendment  Act  of  2005  empowered  states  to  make  special  provisions  for  SEBCs  and  SC/STs  in  admissions  to  educational  institutions.  In  2018,  the  102nd  amendment  was  introduced.  The  Mandal  Commission  asked  and  received  27  percent  reservation  in  1980,  which  was  implemented  in  1992.  In  the  instance  of  Indra  Swahney,  it  was  decided  that  in  whatever  situation  of  reservation,  the  50  percent  cap  would  never  be  exceeded  (including  SC  and  ST  reservation  should  not  cross  50  percent  ). 

102nd    Amendment 

This  Amendment  took  away  the  state’s  power.  The  state  no  longer  has  the  authority  to  determine  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  included  in  the  OBC  list,  and  this  authority  has  been  transferred  to  the  president  and  the  centre  to  determine  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  included  in  the  OBC  list.  The  parliament  will  decide  which  classes  and  communities  will  be  removed  from  the  list  and  which  will  be  added.  

The  national  Commission  for  Backward  Classes  now  has  constitutional  status  as  a  result  of  this  modification.  NCBC  was  founded  in  1993,  and  the  102nd  Amendment  granted  it  constitutional  legitimacy. 

This  change  was  made  under  Article  338B  (102nd  Amendment),   which  deals  with  the  NCBC  structure,  duties,  and  power,  and  was  primarily  for  the  socially  and  educationally  backward  classes  to  fight  for  their  rights,  and  in  Article  342A,  which  stated  that  the  centre  and  president  of 

India  have  the  power  to  make  the  OBC  list.SEBCs  are  defined  under  Article  366  (26C).The  102nd  Constitution  Amendment  Act  of  2018  included  these  articles  into  the  statutes. 

Objective  Of  105th    Constitutional  Amendment  Act 

The  102nd  amendment  was  ratified  by  the  parliament  in  2018,  which  said  that  the  federal  government  and  parliament  have  the  authority  to  compile  a  list  of  OBCs  and  offer  reservations  to  them.  However,  there  was  a  difficulty  in  that  some  people  who  were  on  the  state  list  were  not  on  the  central  list,  and  therefore  were  unable  to  use  the  OBC  reservation  system.  As  a  result,  the  105th  amendment  bill  empowers  the  state  government  to  compile  a  list  of  OBCs  and  award  them  with  reservations.

The  127th  Amendment  Bill  to  the  Constitution  restores  states’  right  to  designate  SEBCs. 

The  127th  amendment  bill  was  introduced  in  the  Lok  Sabha  on  August  9,  2021,  passed  by  the Lok  Sabha  on  August  10,  2021,  and  then  passed  by  the  Rajya  Sabha  on  August  11,  2021.  The  Constitutional  Amendment  Bill  is  unique  in  that  it  is  not  like  any  other  bill  in  that  it  does  not  require  joint  seating.  It  can  be  introduced  in  either  house,  but  it  must  be  passed  by  a  special  majority  in  the  other  house.  There  was  not  a  single  vote  against  the  bill  in  the  Lok  Sabha. 

The  105th  Amendment’s  Importance 

The  bill  aims  to  restore  state  governments’  ability  to  identify  OBCs  who  are  socially  and  educationally  disadvantaged.  The  Union  administration  has  argued  that  the  102nd  amendment’s  sole  purpose  was  to  create  a  Central  List  that  would  only  apply  to  the  Central  government  and  its  institutions.  It  had  nothing  to  do  with  the  State  Backward  Classes  Lists  or  the  State  governments’  authority  to  label  a  community  backward.3    

Nearly  671  OBC  communities  would  have  lost  access  to  reservations  in  educational  institutions  and  appointments  if  the  state  list  had  been  eliminated,  therefore  the  bill  will  assist  them. 

Calls  for  removal  of  50%  cap  on  reservations: 

During  the  debate  over  the  proposed  change,  MPs  from  all  parties  called  for  the  reservation  cap  to  be  removed.  The  Supreme  Court  set  a  limit  of  50%  for  reservation  quotas  in  the  1992  Indra  Sawhney  &  Others  v.  Union  of  India  decision. 

At  least  three  Indian  states  —  Haryana,  Tamil  Nadu,  and  Chhattisgarh  –  have  enacted  quotas  that  exceed  the  overall  50%  limit.  States  such  as  Gujarat,  Rajasthan,  Jharkhand,  and  Karnataka,  on  the  other  hand,  have  petitioned  the  Supreme  Court  to  raise  the  quota  ceiling. 

The  SC  in  the  Maratha  reservation  issue  had  held  that  extending  the  50%  limit  would  be  tantamount  to  establishing  a  society  based  on  caste  rule  rather  than  one  founded  on  equality.  It  reiterated  that  reservation  under  Article  16(4)  should  not  exceed  50%  except  in  extraordinary  circumstances. 

In  the  Maratha  reservation  case,  the  Supreme  Court  ruled  that  expanding  the  50%  ceiling  would  be  tantamount  to  creating  a  society  based  on  caste  domination  rather  than  equality.  It  reaffirmed  that,  save  in  exceptional  circumstances,  reservations  under  Article  16(4)  should  not  exceed  50%. 

What  was  the  opposition’s  motivation  for  supporting  the  amendment  bill? 

The  opposition  in  Parliament  announced  that  it  will  support  the  127th  Constitution  Amendment  Bill,  which  allows  states  the  authority  to  identify  OBCs. Many  regional  parties  have  urged  that  the  State  Governments  be  given  the  right  to  identify  the  backward  classes,  hence  the  amendment  bill  has  political  repercussions.  The  ruling  BJP  and  opposition  parties,  including  the  Congress,  are  attempting  to  gain  support  from  OBC  populations  in  election-bound  states,  particularly  in  Uttar  Pradesh,  which  is  politically  significant. Because  of  the  bill’s  political  implications,  opposition  parties  have  been  pushed  to  align  with  the  ruling  party. 

How  Maratha  reservation  is  related to   105th amendment? 

In  the  year  2019,  the  Maharashtra  government  gave  the  maratha  community  a  16  percent  reservation,  which  was  challenged  in  the  Bombay  high  court  and  the  Supreme  Court  as  a  violation  of  the  landmark  judgement  Indra  swahney  decision,  which  stated  that  the  reserve  should  not  exceed  50  percent.  Because  22.5  percent  for  SC  and  27  percent  for  OBC  already  made  up  49.5  percent  of  the  reservation,  and  the  Maharashtra  government  added  another  16  percent,  the  supreme  court  declared  this  invalid  and  stated  that  states  do  not  have  the  power  to  make  reservation  lists  because  the  102nd  amendment  was  passed.And,  due  to  the  recent  105th  Amendment,  the  federal  government  will  circumvent  the  Supreme  Court  and  give  state  governments  the  authority  to  establish  OBC  lists  and  provide  reservations  in  accordance  with  them.  

Where  does  the  government  receive  its  information  about  how  much  reservation  should  be  given  to  each  class  and  community? 

They  learn  how  much  reservation  should  be  offered  to  the  class  and  community  through  census.  They  learn  about  the  SC  and  ST  population  rates,  as  well  as  how  many  people  have  migrated  from  India  to  the  United  States.  

Mandal  Commission  detractors 

Mandal  commission  used  data  from  the  1931  census  to  determine  the  population  rate  of  the  OBC  and  demanded  a  27  percent  quota.5    

Critics  of  the  Mandal  Commission  contend  that  bestowing  specific  privileges  based  on  caste  is  unjust,  even  if  it  is  intended  to  address  traditional  caste  inequality.  They  contend  that  individuals  who  are  deserving  of  a  seat  on  the  basis  of  merit  will  be  disadvantaged.  They  consider  the  ramifications  of  unqualified  candidates  being  appointed  to  key  positions  in  society  (doctors,  engineers,  etc.).  As  the  discussion  over  OBC  reservations  grows,  a  few  fascinating  facts  emerge  that  highlight  important  questions.  To  begin  with,  the  percentage  of  OBCs  in  India’s  population  varies  greatly.  It  is  52  percent,  according  to  the  Mandal  Commission  (1980).  

  According  to  the  2001  Indian  Census,  the  Scheduled  Castes  account  for  166,635,700  of  India’s  population  of  1,028,737,436  people,  while  the  Scheduled  Tribes  account  for  84,326,240,  or  16.2  percent  and  8.2  percent,  respectively.  The  census  contains  no  information  on  OBCs.  However,  according  to  the  1999–2000  round  of  the  National  Sample  Survey,  roughly  36%  of  the  country’s  population  is  classified  as  belonging  to  the  Other  Backward  Classes  (OBC).    

Conclusion 

According  to  a  recent  statement  from  the  Ministry  of  Social  Justice  and  Empowerment,  the Constitution  (One  Hundred  and  Fifth  Amendment)  Act,  2021  went  into  effect  on  August  15, 2021.  The  President’s  signature  to  the  105th  Amendment  Act  last  month  restored  the  power  of  state  governments  and  union  territories  to  identify  and  describe  social  and  economic  issues.[3]     

On  May  5,  a  five-judge  Constitutional  bench  unanimously  overturned  a  Maharashtra  statute  guaranteeing  quotas  to  Marathas.  The  bench  had  refused  to  refer  the  Mandal  decision  from  1992,  which  set  a  50%  quota  limit,  to  a  larger  bench.[4]    

This  topic  has  been  highly  paradoxical  till  now,  as  argument  on  reservation  has  come  from  many  years,  and  it  is  still  being  amended  to  ensure  that  everyone  gets  their  rights  and  that  no  one  faces  prejudice,  and  to  make  India  a  more  equal  society. 

  States  and  Union  Territories  will  now  have  the  ability  to  create  their  own  lists  of  socially  and  educationally  disadvantaged  groups.  They  will  be  able  to  do  this  without  having  to  consult  NCBC.  An  OBC  can  now  be  formed  by  any  electorally  significant  group.  According  to  some  experts,  the  Bill  has  the  potential  to  generate  socio-political  upheaval  because  several  sub-castes  are  now  likely  to  demand  quotas. 


[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandal_Commission 

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Other_Backward_Class 

[3] https://www.livelaw.in/news-updates/105th-constitutional-amendment-comes-into-force-sebc-identification -power-to-states-and-uts- 

[4] https://economictimes.indiatimes.com 

Author: Shivani Agrawal, Lloyd Law College, Greater Noida

Editor: Kanishka VaishSenior Editor, LexLife India

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s